Chores for children

boy-chores

Doing chores with money incentives

To use chores as part of the weekly or monthly allowance. Children feel independent, and they get the opportunity to practice making financial decisions. For example, is the time I spend on the task worth the reward I get?

Almost all families expect their children to help out around the home. Some children are given tasks that they are responsible for every day or week, and some do them when they are asked.

In any case, it is positive to use chores as part of the weekly or monthly allowance. Children feel independent, and they get the opportunity to practice making financial decisions. For example, is the time I spend on the task worth the reward I get? This is an important lesson that will help them in their careers as adults.

The Gimi app presents chores and rewards in a simple and fun way. Children usually like doing chores, but they need a way to keep track of the chores so they can feel independent. Of course, this is related to the development of financial literacy and extra money as motivation.

 

How old should children be to start doing chores?

Children of all ages can do chores. Younger children can also help if you choose simpler chores appropriate for their age. A chore that is too difficult can be frustrating for children, and in some cases dangerous, and one that is too easy is perceived as boring, which usually leads to the child not doing it at all. Give simpler chores to younger children, such as taking care of and putting away their toys. Make the task more difficult and add responsibility as they get older.

It is also important to come up with chores that mean that your child takes care of the whole family. A simple task is to set and clear the table. Your child will probably feel like a responsible and important family member.

Here are examples of tasks for children of different ages.

Chores for younger children (5-8 years)

  • Set the table
  • Help out with cooking dinner
  • Help put clean clothes in piles so each family member can fold their clothes
  • Take part in shopping and buying food
  • Hang clothes to dry

Chores for school-aged children (9-12)

  • Water plants in the garden and indoors
  • Feed pets
  • Clean the sink, wipe the sink, mop the floor and take out the trash
  • Hang clothes to dry and fold clean laundry
  • Put away crockery and cutlery
  • Decide what you will eat for dinner and help with shopping for the food

Chores for teenagers
Coming up with chores that teenagers want to do is a little trickier. Cleaning together with the family is not as fun anymore, but don’t give up! Your teen may appreciate the experience more than you think.

Here are examples of chores for teenagers:

  • Sweep and vacuum
  • Clean common areas
  • Clean the bathroom
  • Cook one meal each week
  • Cut the grass
  • Wash

 

Chores & rewards

When a chore is rewarded, you show that it is OK not to do the chore because then the child does not get a reward. When you explain what a reward is, don’t forget to explain that your child chooses whether they do the chore or not. They get the opportunity to earn more money, or not to earn any money. It’s as obvious as getting wet if you play in the rain without a rain jacket. Giving your children weekly money as a reward for chores can motivate them, but you should also communicate that there are other reasons for doing certain chores.

 

Money as a reward is very motivating. You can also consider the rewards below to motivate your children:

  • Do the task together until your child can do it on their own.
  • Talk about why it is positive that a certain chore has been done.
  • Open up to the possibility that the child may propose his own chores.

 

Reward scheme

Get started with rewards with the Gimi app, a great way for your kids to become money smart and develop a positive money behaviour! If you prefer pen and paper, you can download our rewards schedule!

 

Download the Gimi app here

Gimi AB is a registered payment service provider for account information services with the Swedish Financial Supervisory Authority, and is under its supervision.